What to Expect

Initial Appointment

Throughout your appointment, you are treated holistically by our professional staff, who provide you with trusted and evidence based medical services and education. If you’re experiencing early signs of pregnancy, we’re here to provide pregnancy testing, ultrasound to confirm viability, STD testing, post abortion support, and resources.

Medical Consultation

Your Medical Consultation will occur during your first visit where you will be given evidence based medical education.

What to Expect Step-by-Step:

  • First you’ll meet with a nurse, who will perform pregnancy testing, provide you with test results, and review your medical history.
  • Following a positive pregnancy test, a nurse or sonographer may perform an ultrasound in order to confirm pregnancy viability and learn the length of gestation.
  • Once your pregnancy test and ultrasound exam are complete, the nurse will provide you with community resources, address your questions, and may schedule a follow-up appointment.
  • Getting a lab quality pregnancy test and an ultrasound are the first steps you can take in making informed choices for your health.
  • STD Testing

    ABC Women’s Clinic tests for the two most common Sexually Transmitted Diseases, Chlamydia and Gonorrhea, for patients with positive pregnancy tests only. For all women, particularly those preparing for an abortion, untreated STDs can have implications on your future reproductive health.
    1Does having a Sexually Transmitted Disease (STD) affect my pregnancy options?
    When considering your pregnancy options, it is important to know if you have an STD. Because abortion and birth are invasive, the STD can spread into your reproductive organs and cause permanent damage. In order to protect your reproductive health for the future, ABC Women’s Clinic tests for the two most common STDs: Chlamydia and Gonorrhea. Women who have an untreated STD are up to 25% more likely to develop Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID) following an abortion procedure. So, it is important to be tested for STDs prior to making any decisions about the outcome of your pregnancy.

    Citation: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
    2How do I know if I have an STD?
    It’s possible to contract sexually transmitted diseases from people who seem perfectly healthy — people who, in fact, aren’t even aware of being infected. STDs have a wide range of signs and symptoms. That’s why they may go unnoticed until complications occur or a partner is diagnosed. Signs and symptoms that might indicate an STD include: Sores or bumps on the genitals or in the oral or rectal area; painful or burning urination; vaginal discharge; unusual vaginal bleeding; sore, swollen lymph nodes, particularly in the groin but sometimes more widespread. Signs and symptoms may appear a few days to three months after exposure, depending on the organism. See a doctor immediately if you are sexually active or you have signs and symptoms of an STD.

    Citation: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

    www.mayoclinic.com/health/sexually-transmitted-diseases-STDs/DS01123
    www.mayoclinic.com/health/sexually-transmitted-diseases-STDs/DS01123/DSECTION=symptoms
    3What are the different ways women can get an STDs?
    STDs are generally acquired by sexual contact. The organisms that cause sexually transmitted diseases may pass from person to person in blood, bodily fluids such as semen, and physical contact. Some of these infections can also be transmitted nonsexually, such as from mother to infant during pregnancy or childbirth, or through blood transfusions or shared needles.

    Citation: Mayo Clinic – Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research
    4Can I get an STD if I’m using condoms or birth control?
    The most common STD, Human Papillomavirus (HPV), is not preventable by contraceptives, including condoms. A woman may contract HPV regardless of the type of birth control she uses. Hormonal contraceptives, such as birth control pills, the shot, the patch, and the ring do not prevent STDs. And because these medications alter the female genital tract, her risk of contracting Chlamydia or HIV increases.

    Citation: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
    5Can STDs be fatal?
    Most STDs are not fatal when treated properly. Symptoms of viral STDs can be treated, but they recur and are infectious for life. Men and women who have any STD are up to five times more likely to contract HIV, the virus that causes AIDS.

    Information on this page provided by the US Centers For Disease Control and Prevention. www.cdc.gov/STD/default.htm

    Chlamydia

    1What is Chlamydia?
    Chlamydia is a common sexually transmitted infection caused by the bacterium Chlamydia trachomatis, which can damage a woman’s reproductive organs. More than one out of five patients who have a Chlamydia infection at the time of an abortion will develop Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID) within four weeks. Chlamydia is the most prevalent bacterial STD. Use of hormonal contraceptives increases your risk of contracting Chlamydia. 75% of women who are infected with Chlamydia do not know they have it, because they have no symptoms. Therefore, it is important to be tested if you are sexually active.
    2What are the symptoms of Chlamydia in women?
  • Abnormal vaginal discharge or burning sensation with urination
  • Lower abdominal pain
  • Low back pain
  • Nausea
  • Fever
  • Painful intercourse
  • Vaginal bleeding between menstrual periods
  • 3What are the symptoms of Chlamydia in men?
  • Discharge from the penis or burning sensation with urination
  • Burning and itching around the opening of the penis
  • Pain and swelling in the testicles (though uncommon)
  • 4How is Chlamydia Treated?
  • Treatment for Chlamydia should be done before having an abortion.
  • ABC Women’s Clinic tests for Chlamydia.
  • Several antibiotics can successfully cure Chlamydia in adolescents and adults.
  • Get yearly check-ups with your doctor.
  • Refrain from intercourse and other sexual activity during treatment for Chlamydia.
  • Notify all sex partners that you have an STD so they can be tested and treated


  • Information on this page provided by the US Centers For Disease Control and Prevention.
    www.cdc.gov/STD/chlamydia/STDfact-chlamydia.htm

    Gonorrhea

    1What is Gonorrhea?
    Gonorrhea is a sexually transmitted infection caused by Neisseria gonorrhoeae, a bacterium that can grow and multiply easily in the warm, moist areas of the reproductive tract in women and men. Most people have no symptoms of Gonorrhea. Those who do get symptoms of Gonorrhea won’t notice them for up to 30 days after infection. Therefore it is important to be tested if you are sexually active.
    2What are the symptoms of Gonorrhea in women?
  • Painful or burning sensation when urinating
  • Increased vaginal discharge
  • Vaginal bleeding between menstrual periods
  • 3What are the symptoms of Gonorrhea in men?
  • Burning sensation when urinating
  • White, yellow, or green discharge from the penis
  • Painful or swollen testicles
  • 4How is Gonorrhea treated?
  • Treatment for Gonorrhea should be done before having an abortion.
  • ABC Women’s Clinic tests for Gonorrhea infection.
  • Several antibiotics can successfully cure Gonorrhea in adolescents and adults.
  • It is important to take all of the medication prescribed to cure Gonorrhea.
  • Get yearly check-ups with your doctor.
  • Refrain from intercourse and other sexual activity during treatment for Gonorrhea.
  • Notify all sex partners that you have an STD so they can be tested and treated.
  • You should be re-tested for Gonorrhea 3-4 months after finishing treatment.


  • Information on this page provided by the US Centers For Disease Control and Prevention

    www.cdc.gov/STD/Gonorrhea/STDFact-gonorrhea.htm

    http://www.cdc.gov/STD/hiv/STDFact-STD&HIV.htm

    PID

    1What is PID?
    Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID) is a general term that refers to infection of the uterus, fallopian tubes, and other reproductive organs in women. PID is a common and serious complication of some sexually transmitted infections, especially Chlamydia and Gonorrhea, when left untreated. PID is a cause of infertility and ectopic pregnancy (pregnancy growing outside the uterus). Symptoms of PID vary from none to severe. When PID is caused by Chlamydia infection, a woman may experience mild symptoms or no symptoms at all, while serious damage is being done to her reproductive organs. Because of vague symptoms, PID goes unrecognized by women and their health care providers about two thirds of the time. Each year in the United States, it is estimated that more than 1 million women experience an episode of acute PID. More than 100,000 women become infertile each year as a result of PID, and a large proportion of the ectopic pregnancies occurring every year are due to the consequences of PID.
    2What are the symptoms of PID?
    Women who have symptoms of PID most commonly have the following symptoms:
  • Lower abdominal pain
  • Fever
  • Unusual vaginal discharge that may have a foul odor
  • Painful intercourse
  • Painful urination
  • Irregular menstrual bleeding
  • Pain in the right upper abdomen, though rare


  • Information on this page provided by the US Centers For Disease Control and Prevention

    http://www.cdc.gov/STD/Gonorrhea/STDFact-gonorrhea.htm

    http://www.cdc.gov/STD/PID/STDFact-PID.htm

    Birth Control

    Contraceptives are methods of preventing or ending pregnancy, also referred to as “birth control,” and work in three ways:
    1Prevent Fertilization.
    Fertilization is the union of a man’s sperm and woman’s egg. Some contraceptives create a physical barrier to block sperm from reaching an egg. Male and female condoms and the diaphragm are examples.
    2Make the Uterus Hostile to Implantation.*
    Contraceptives can attempt to prevent a baby from implanting in the mother’s uterus after fertilization by creating a hostile environment. Intra-uterine Devices (IUDs) and chemical methods are in this category.
    3Alter Body Chemistry.*
    Typically referred to as “hormonal” contraceptives, synthetic steroids like the pill mimic hormones to prevent pregnancy by changing a woman’s body chemistry, which has three impacts:

  • Prevent ovulation, the release of the egg each menstrual cycle.
  • Produce less and thicker mucus in the cervix so that sperm cannot easily enter the uterus.
  • Thin the lining of the uterus, making it more difficult for a fertilized egg to implant.
  • Chemical contraceptives include the oral birth control pill, Depo-Provera injection, patch, and implant. Chemical methods provide no protection against STDs and can actually increase your risk of getting an STD by making your reproductive tract more vulnerable to infection.

    *Note: Methods in categories 2 and 3 can be ‘abortifacient,’ meaning that they end the life of a developing baby

  • ABC Women’s Clinic does not provide birth control, as it is not 100% effective against unwanted pregnancy or sexually transmitted disease. *Fifty one percent of women who have abortions had used a contraceptive method in the month they got pregnant, most commonly condoms (27%) or a hormonal method (17%). Factoring individual circumstances, we will refer patients to consult with their family physician for contraceptives. *Guttmacher Institute – July 2014